500th Anniversary of the Reformation

Women and the Reformation

"I am prepared to lose everything, even life or limb. May God stand by me." “So wrote Argula von Grumbach (1492–1563/68?) from Bavaria, who found Martin Luther’s message of Christian freedom and equality empowering. This noble woman challenged an entire Catholic university in Ingolstadt in defense of Lutheran faith and was a student persecuted for “Lutheran heresy.” This best-selling lay author’s letter-treatises eventually disappeared un­der pressure from male authorities. Luther considered her a valiant hero of faith.” So we read in Augsburg Fortress Reformation 500 materials.

The role of women in the Reformation, and our Lutheran history to follow, is not understood by many. Katie Luther we may know. Argula von Grumbach, and so many women reformers, you may not. Today Lutherans are blessed with women pastors, bishops, teachers, healers and mystics. It has not always been so. Nor, are women spiritual leaders recognized equally even in all Lutheran denominations around the world. The Reformation continues.

Why might women today find the Lutheran message of “Christian freedom and equality” empowering? Answer: Because the world is not yet free.

During my pastoral internship in 1982 I met a German Lutheran trained theologian in her late 70s. She was a member of the congregation I served. One day she told me her story, how she had met an American Lutheran pastor, married and moved to the U.S. Her husband was from a Lutheran denomination that did not ordain women. Almost in passing she said, “Of course, I couldn’t stay in prison forever . . .” so she and her husband had changed churches.

“I couldn’t stay in prison forever!” I remember this woman clearly. She was articulate, often times took me to task after a sermon or Bible class; she clearly felt like her move to the U.S. had robbed her of an essential part of her identity, and her “inner monk” had long ago burst forth as the Reformer.

Lutheran women have been, and are, gifted proclaimers of the Word. They also carry stories of oppression, abuse, marginalization and struggle. In this they keep us close to the very essence of the Reformation.  

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has written, “There is no more valuable investment than in a girl’s education.”  Lutherans would agree!

Keep the Faith!

Bishop Dave Brauer-Rieke
Oregon Synod - ELCA

 

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The Augsburg Confession

This is intense. October 31, 1517 Martin Luther nails his 95 Theses to the church door. “Can we talk?” Apparently not. So, Luther continues to agitate.

In October of 1518 and January of 1519 Luther debates with leading Roman Catholic Theologians. In 1521 Luther is ex-communicated. He is also declared an outlaw by Emperor Charles V. (It is during this time of banishment that Luther translates the New Testament into German.) By 1525 some 100,000 German peasants lay dead in the streets. The Reformation had become open revolt. In 1530 Emperor Charles V said “Enough!” Spiritual unrest had erupted into political dysfunction. Yes, that’s how it works.

The Augsburg Confession was written for a meeting called by Charles V. In it, Luther clarified the teachings of the now 13-year-old Lutheran movement. He articulated what it was Reformers and Roman Catholics agreed on, what they didn’t, and what in their disagreements were central and peripheral. Common ground was still not found.

In times of social, political and religious discord defining oneself is essential. “Iron sharpens iron.” As the scriptures say. Mush sharpens nothing!   

As the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation comes to us Lutherans continue to define, refine and contextualize our faith and witness.

·        American Lutheranism has a 78-year history of refugee resettlement and relocation work through Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services (LIRS.) Over these years, we have helped settle over 500,000 refugees. We will continue this work.

·        In 1945 American Lutherans formed a government advocacy effort which today is known as the Lutheran Office of Governmental Affairs. Through LOGA we have under our belt 72 years of advocating for individual and family rights and benefits. Our voice will stay in the debate.

·        And, for over 150 years, Lutheran hospitals have served the sick, counseling centers have worked with families, and adoption agencies have striven for the wellbeing and safety of children. Lutheran Services of America now touches one in every 50 American lives. There is still work to do!

We know who we are, doctrinally, functionally and spiritually. The coming 500th Anniversary of the Lutheran Reformation finds us once again in the midst of spiritual unrest and political dysfunction. You know what to do. Do it!  

With you on the journey,

Bp. Dave Brauer-Rieke

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Luther's Small Catechism

Martin Luther’s Small Catechism is an amazing gift to the Church. For almost 500 years this little pamphlet has laid out the basics of Christian faith and teaching in a way anybody can understand. “What does this mean?” is a question designed to live in the heart of any inquisitive Christian. It’s all about the basics. If you’re a Christian, memorize the Small Catechism. It couldn’t hurt!

However, we do not live in a Christian culture any more. Our needs are different. What does this mean?  It means a lot! For example, here we are in the middle of Advent, we may find ourselves deeply em-bedded in practices of consumption rather than prayer. Soon it will be Christmas and we may talk about gifts rather than Incarnation. The “unchurched” – not just young people, but individuals of all ages and identity –hunger to talk about over consumption and what it’s
doing to our earth. How the Divine manifests itself in the everyday? People long to explore the mystery of incarnation. Yet, they perceive, rightly or wrongly, that
this is no longer what we in the Church are about.

What does this mean?

The question of the Catechism is not about calling forth the Reformer. The Catechism is about our common grounding. What is different in today’s world is that the teachings of the faith alone can no longer form our cultural, common grounding. The Church is no longer “the voice” of the culture. We are simply “a” voice.

Let’s talk about Baptism as the Small Catechism does. Yes! But when Luther asks “What is Baptism?” and writes, “Baptism is not simply plain water. Instead, it is water used according to God’s command and connected with God’s Word.” Let’s talk more about that part. What is God’s command for water, and how is it connected, deeply connected, with the incarnate Word? That’s a question that has traction today. Let’s talk ecology, faith and life!

Or, when reading Luther on the Lord’s Prayer, “Give us this day our daily bread.” And Luther asks, “What does this mean, ‘Daily Bread?’” saying, “Daily bread is everything included in the necessities and nourishment for our bodies, such as food, drink, clothing, house, farm …” let’s talk more about that part. Luther insists that God gives us our daily bread “Without prayer.” How does that work?

“The basics” for our world today are not to be taught. They are to be discovered. Like the baby Jesus, cradled in a bed of straw, you and I must start again. Listen, love, and learn. 

Blessed Advent,

Bp. Dave Brauer-Rieke

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Martin Luther's German Bible

The Bible always and forever belongs to God. Whether it be in German, English, or Spanish, it is “the Word” – and as such it comes to us as God wills. Part and parcel with Reformation, Lutherans celebrate Martin Luther’s translation of the New Testament into German. What this is all about, though, is the return of the Word to the people.

Putting the Bible into the hands of just everybody is a dangerous thing. We forget that Luther was among the first to do this. It is dangerous because the Word itself is dangerous. Oh yes, it is! The Word releases the Reformer in us, and when the Reformer appears the powers quake and people become uncomfortable.  Sit down and read the Bible – English is fine. You’ll see that what I say it true.

The fascinating part of the ‘Luther translating the Bible’ story is the trauma he went through in doing so.  The words he picked had to be just right.  There were political, economic and religious themes that challenged him. “How do you say that?” What is the cost of doing so?

Enter the Reformer. Enter trials, confrontations and divisions – all because the Word had been set loose once again.

Fear not! Know, though, that to read the Bible is to translate the Bible. “If they take our house, goods, fame, child, or spouse, they cannot win the day!”  Luther sings in A Mighty Fortress. Fear not. You can do this. 

We cannot read Scripture passively. You are invited to translate the words into 21st century Oregonian, that is to live the Word in a way that makes sense in the here and now. Nobody else can do this – only you!

Translate. Let the Word call out the Reformer in you.

By translating the New Testament into German Luther declared that he trusted the Spirit more than bishops or scholars. With Luther, I trust the Spirit in you. I believe that God will preach through your life, and that your life is vital!

It is not the Reformer who makes trouble. The world just sees us that way sometimes. The Bible both comforts and confronts. It forgives even while it condemns. And truly, Christ gives life even as he bids us to take up our cross.

Today I invite you to embrace your calling as a translator. Let the Reformer loose. Start with the Bible. Just read it. The rest will follow.

With you on the journey,

Bp. Dave Brauer-Rieke

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Martin Luther: Monk to Reformer

So how is your Inner Monk doing? Augsburg Fortress has created a Reformation 500 resource book for congregations with lots of great stuff in it. One offering in this book is a series of bulletin inserts called, “ABOUT THE LUTHERANS.” You have to buy the book to get the inserts (and I encourage you to do so) but I’m also making inserts of my own for you which are designed to be a complement. Augsburg Fortress is offering you some history. I want to ask about the future!

So, how is your Inner Monk doing? “Martin Luther: Monk to Reformer” is the title of Augsburg Fortress’ insert – and mine. On their insert they offer these great gems of insight:

·        “Not long after he (the young monk, Luther) arrived in Wittenberg, he became incensed by the church…”

·        “Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses stirred up a hornet’s nest in the church and began the Reformation …”

·        “For challenging the church and refusing to back down, Luther was called before the Holy Roman emperor, Charles V …”

It was Luther’s “inner Monk,” his sense and practice of God; what he had been taught as a child – and a sense of betrayal that not all was as he had been told – that unleashed the Reformer in him - and oh the cost of letting that Reformer out!

The history of Luther is fascinating. Yet, what good is remembering this history if we don’t likewise listen to our inner Monk, and release the Reformer? It is not Martin Luther who makes us Lutheran. It is the Reformer within.

So let me ask you as your bishop: “What is troubling your soul? What is not as it seems? What were you taught that no longer fits? How do we articulate your Christian faith in a new day?’ What needs to change in the world around you?” We have the coming year to ask these questions.

October 31, 2017 will mark 500 years since “The Reformer” in Luther began to emerge. Oregon arise! This anniversary calls out to the Reformer within you!!

With you on the journey,

Bp. Dave Brauer-Rieke

Please find two bulletin insert PDF files below.  "Anniversary insert" you are free to copy and use as you wish. "Augsburg_01_MartinLuther"  is posted for display only. No further reproduction allowed without written permission of Augsburg Fortress. 

From Reformation 500 Sourcebook: Anniversary Resources for Congregations copyright © 2016 Augsburg Fortress. Posted by permission for display only. No further reproduction allowed without the written permission of Augsburg Fortress

 

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Upcoming Events:

All these events are open to everyone, regardless of where they are held!

A Corvallis Reformation!

Sunday, October 1, 2017
Luther House and Grace Lutheran Church, Corvallis

Reformation@500-Corvallis is an OSU campus- and community-wide observance that probes the depth of Luther’s theological wrestling, the intertwining relationship between religion and civic life, and artistic expressions that accompanied – even promulgated – his reforming ideals.

Join friends, nighbors, Luther House Ministries, Grace Lutheran Church and other ministry partners in Corvallis for one a great selection of community/Reformation lectures, singing event and films.  See what all is happening this fall at http://luther-house.org/programs/reformation500/

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Faith Dialogues with Dr. Samuel Torvend

Friday, September 29, 2017 to Sunday, October 1, 2017
St. Mark's Lutheran, 790 Marion Street NE Salem, OR

Faith Dialogues will be presenting Dr. Samuel Torvend on September 29th, 30th, & October 1st, 2017 for three days of discussion and teaching about Martin Luther and the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

Friday night lecture:

ALL THINGS ARE BEING MADE NEW: THE CONTEMPORARY RELEVANCE OF THE REFORMATION

In this presentation, participants will consider the different reforming streams of the sixteenth century that emerged from a fresh encounter with the Bible and the distinctive gifts each reform offers the Christian community today. Not only will the Lutheran Reformation be explored—the Reformed and Wesleyan movements will be considered as well.

Saturday workshop:

EUCHARISTIC PRACTICE IN THE MIDST OF ECONOMIC INJUSTICE

This interactive presentation and conversation will invite participants to consider the revolutionary reform of sacrament and social assistance promoted by early Lutheran congregations. At the same time, we will consider the “economy” of the Eucharist and the questions this sacramental practice raises in a land marked by poverty and continued food insecurity.

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Re-forming the Reformation

Friday, September 15, 2017 to Sunday, September 17, 2017
Augustana Lutheran, 2710 NE 14th Ave, Portland

Renowned Luther scholar Dr. Timothy J. Wengert will present a lecture series at Augustana, Portland: "Re-Forming the Reformation by Learning to Post the 95 Theses."

  • Friday evening: "What Luther Said in the 95 These and Why He Said It" (general audience; free)
  • Saturday morning: "Luther's View of the Christian Life" ($15; lunch available for purchase following; information about times and registration will be provided)
  • Sunday morning sermon and forum: "The Freedom of a Christian" (free)

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National Lutheran Choir Concert

Saturday, September 30, 2017 to Sunday, October 1, 2017
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Portland and St. Paul's Episcopal, Salem

Under the direction of Dr. David Cherwien, the 60-voice National Lutheran Choir's rich and diverse repertoire ranges from early chant to new compositions and from simple folk anthems to complex masterworks. The NLC was the recipient of the 2007 Margaret Hillis Award for Choral Excellence from Chorus America and the 2007 Wittenberg Award from the Luther Institute.

Tickets are now on sale for the concert which will be held at Trinity Cathedral in Portland, OR Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 1:00 PM. Purchase your tickets here.

A second, shorter, concert will be held at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Salem, at 1444 Liberty Street SE, Sunday October 1, 2014 immediately following their 4:00 PM Evensong Service. Tickets are not required, but freewill offerings will be received at the door. 

Your Reformation will simply not be complete without hearing this amazing choir!

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